What Size Kidney Stone Requires Lithotripsy?

If you’re wondering what size kidney stone requires lithotripsy, you’re not alone. Many people are unsure about the answer to this question.

At Urology Associates, we are here to help. We are the leading urology group in New England and we have a team of experts who can help you determine the best course of treatment for your kidney stones.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We are here to help you get

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Introduction

Lithotripsy is a medical procedure used to treat kidney stones. The word “lithotripsy” comes from the Greek words “lithos” (meaning stone) and “tripsis” (meaning crushing).

There are two types of lithotripsy:

-Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL): This procedure uses sound waves to create shock waves that pass through the body and break up the kidney stones.

-Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL): This procedure involves making a small incision in the back and using a special scope to remove the kidney stones.

Kidney stones come in a variety of sizes. The size of the kidney stone is one factor that determines whether or not lithotripsy will be an effective treatment option. In general, lithotripsy is most effective for treating kidney stones that are less than 2 cm in diameter. Stones that are larger than 2 cm may require another treatment option such as PCNL.

What is lithotripsy?

Lithotripsy is a medical procedure used to treat kidney stones. Kidney stones are hard deposits of minerals and salts that form inside your kidneys. Lithotripsy uses sound waves or lasers to break kidney stones into small pieces so they can pass through your urinary system.

There are two types of lithotripsy:
-Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL): This type of lithotripsy uses shock waves to break up kidney stones. The shock waves are created by a machine outside of your body. You will be positioned on a table and the machine will be directed at your kidney stone.
-Ureteroscopy: This type of lithotripsy uses a special scope to break up kidney stones. The scope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and camera on the end. It is inserted through the urethra and into the bladder, then passed through the ureter and into the kidney. Once it is in place, the scope can be used to break up the kidney stone with lasers or sound waves.

Kidney stones come in all shapes and sizes, so there is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. Some small kidney stones may pass on their own, but larger ones may require lithotripsy or another treatment option.

Why is lithotripsy necessary?

Lithotripsy is a medical procedure that uses shock waves or lasers to break down kidney stones. The stones are then passed through the urinary system and out of the body.

Kidney stones can cause severe pain and can lead to serious health complications if they are not treated. Lithotripsy is usually recommended for stones that are too large to pass on their own or for stones that are causing pain or blockage.

How is lithotripsy performed?

There are three ways that lithotripsy can be performed:

-Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL): This is the most common type of lithotripsy. You lie on a table, and the machine sends shock waves through your body to break up the stones. ESWL can be used on most types of kidney stones.

-Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL): This is a more invasive procedure and is used when other methods haven’t worked or when the kidney stones are too large. During this procedure, the surgeon makes a small incision in your back and inserts a thin tube into your kidney. The surgeon then uses a laser to break up the stones. PCNL can be used on most types of kidney stones.

-Ureteroscopy: This procedure is used when the stone is in the ureter or if you have had previous urinary tract surgery. A thin, flexible tube called a ureteroscope is inserted into your urinary tract through your urethra and passed up to your kidney. The surgeon then uses a laser to break up the stones.

What are the risks and side effects associated with lithotripsy?

There are several potential risks and side effects associated with lithotripsy, although they are generally mild. These include:

-Blood in the urine
-Low blood pressure
-Kidney damage
-Infection
-Nausea and vomiting
-Pain
-Possible urinary tract infection

Conclusion

In conclusion, there is no definitive answer to the question of what size kidney stone requires lithotripsy. The decision depends on a number of factors, including the severity of the blockage, the size and location of the stone, and the patient’s overall health. If you are experiencing pain or other symptoms caused by a kidney stone, be sure to speak with your doctor to determine the best course of treatment.