What Size of Prostate Is Dangerous?

If you’re a man over the age of 50, you may be wondering what size of prostate is considered dangerous. While there is no definitive answer, there are some guidelines you can follow.

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The Prostate Gland

The prostate is a walnut-sized gland that is part of the male reproductive system. The prostate is located in front of the rectum and below the bladder. The prostate gland produces a fluid that is released during ejaculation. The prostate gland also helps to control the flow of urine.

What is the prostate?

The prostate is a gland that is part of the male reproductive system. It is located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum. The prostate gland produces a fluid that protects and enriches sperm cells. The prostate also helps to expel semen during ejaculation. The prostate gland is about the size of a walnut and it can expand as a man ages.

What is the prostate’s role in the body?

The prostate is a male reproductive gland that is responsible for the production of semen. The prostate is located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum. The prostate surrounds the urethra, which is the pathway that urine travels through when it is expel

Prostate Size

The prostate is a walnut-sized gland located in front of the rectum and below the bladder. The urethra, which is the tube that carries urine and semen out of the body, runs through the prostate. The prostate’s main job is to produce semen.

What is a normal prostate size?

A normal prostate is about the size of a walnut. It gradually increases in size with age. The average prostate weighs about 20 grams (0.7 ounce).

Prostate enlargement is also called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It’s not cancer, but it can be serious. An enlarged prostate can squeeze the urethra and block the flow of urine from the bladder. This can cause urinary problems, such as:

-A need to urinate more often, especially at night
-An urgent need to urinate
-Difficulty starting urination
-Weak or interrupted flow of urine
-Difficulty emptying the bladder completely
-Sudden leakage or dribbling of urine
-Inability to urinate

What is an enlarged prostate?

An enlarged prostate occurs when the prostate gland grows larger than it should. The prostate is a small, walnut-shaped gland that is part of the male reproductive system. It is located in front of the rectum and below the bladder, where it surrounds the urethra (the tube through which urine exits the body).

The prostate gland produces a fluid that makes up part of semen. Enlargement of the prostate can cause problems with urination and sexual function.

Prostate enlargement is also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or benign prostatic hypertrophy. It is not cancerous and does not increase your risk of developing prostate cancer. However, some of the symptoms of enlarged prostate can be similar to those of prostate cancer, so it is important to see your doctor for a diagnosis.

What are the causes of an enlarged prostate?

An enlarged prostate is often caused by a condition called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which involves the noncancerous growth of the gland. The prostate may also become enlarged as a result of cancer.

Other conditions that can cause an enlarged prostate include:
-Aging
– Obesity
– Family history
– Certain medications, such as testosterone replacement therapy or certain antidepressants

If you have an enlarged prostate, you may not experience any symptoms. However, if the gland presses on your urethra, you may notice symptoms such as:
-A weak or interrupted urinary stream
– Difficulty starting urination
– Frequent urination, especially at night
– Sudden urges to urinate
– Straining to urinate or feeling like you can’t completely empty your bladder
– Dribbling after urination

Prostate Cancer

cancer. It is the second most common cancer in men worldwide. In 2018, 1.3 million men were diagnosed with prostate cancer and about 367,000 men died from it. The prostate is a small gland in men that is located below the bladder.

What is prostate cancer?

Prostate cancer is a disease in which cancer cells form in the prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. The prostate is about the size of a walnut and is located just below the bladder (the organ that collects and stores urine). The prostate secretes fluid that helps to keep the sperm alive and nourishes them.

Most prostate cancers are slow growing; however, some types of prostate cancer can grow and spread quickly. Prostate cancer that is found early (before it has spread outside of the prostate) is often curable. Prostate cancer that has spread to other parts of the body is more difficult to treat and can be fatal.

The cause of prostate cancer is unknown, but it seems to be related to both genetic and lifestyle factors. Age, race, and family history are all risk factors for developing prostate cancer. A diet high in saturated fat may also increase your risk.

What are the symptoms of prostate cancer?

Prostate cancer is a form of cancer that affects the prostate, a small walnut-shaped gland in men that produces the seminal fluid that nourishes and transports sperm. Prostate cancer usually grows slowly and is initially confined to the prostate gland, where it may not cause serious harm. However, while some types of prostate cancer grow slowly and may need minimal or no treatment, other types are aggressive and can spread quickly. Prostate cancer that has metastasized, or spread to other parts of the body, is more difficult to treat and can be life-threatening.

The symptoms of prostate cancer can be similar to those of other conditions, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or enlarged prostate. As a result, prostate cancer may be initially overlooked. In its early stages, prostate cancer may cause no symptoms at all. When symptoms do appear, they may include:

-Trouble urinating
-Decreased force in the stream of urine
Blood in the urine
-Painful ejaculation
-Discomfort in the pelvic area
-Swelling in the legs

What are the risk factors for prostate cancer?

According to the National Cancer Institute, the following are risk factors for prostate cancer:

-Increasing age – The risk for prostate cancer increases with age. About 6 in 10 cases are diagnosed in men aged 65 or older.
-A family history of prostate cancer – Having a father or brother with prostate cancer more than doubles a man’s risk of developing this disease.
– Race – Prostate cancer occurs more frequently in African-American men than in men of other races. In fact, African-American men are more than twice as likely to develop prostate cancer as white men, and they are also more than twice as likely to die of the disease.
-Certain genetic changes – Men who have inherited specific genetic changes (mutations) linked to an increased risk of several cancers, including prostate cancer, breast cancer, and ovarian cancer, may be at increased risk for prostate cancer. These include mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2.

When to See a Doctor

If you have an enlarged prostate, you may not have any symptoms, or your symptoms may be mild. However, if your prostate enlarges to the point where it blocks your urinary tract, you may have urinary retention. This means you can’t empty your bladder completely.

When should you see a doctor for an enlarged prostate?

If you have any of the following symptoms, you should see a doctor:

-You have a strong need to urinate more often than usual, especially at night.
-You have a weak or interrupted urinary stream.
-You feel pain or burning during urination.
-You have blood in your urine.

When should you see a doctor for prostate cancer?

A prostate cancer diagnosis can be confusing and even scary. treatments can have serious side effects, so it’s important to know when to see a doctor and what questions to ask.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that men with an average risk of prostate cancer should begin talking to their doctor about the pros and cons of testing at age 50. However, men with higher than average risk, such as African Americans or men who have a father or brother with prostate cancer, should begin these conversations at age 45.

If you’re not sure whether you’re at higher risk, talk to your doctor about your family history and other risk factors. The ACS also recommends that men should not be tested for prostate cancer if they do not have symptoms and are not expected to live at least 10 more years.

Men who have symptoms that could be caused by prostate cancer should see a doctor right away. These symptoms can include trouble urinating, a need to urinate more often, especially at night;painful or burning urination; pain in the pelvic area; bone pain; erectile dysfunction; and blood in the urine or semen.

Your doctor may feel your prostate during a digital rectal exam (DRE) or order a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) Blood test to look for signs of prostate cancer. If either of these tests is abnormal, your doctor may recommend a biopsy of the prostate.

A biopsy is the only way to know for sure if you have prostate cancer. If the biopsy shows that you have prostate cancer, your doctor will work with you to decide which treatment option is best for you based on the stage (extent) of the disease, your overall health and your personal preferences.

Treatment

Generally, if the prostate enlarges to a size where it starts to compress the urethra, treatment is necessary. If left untreated, an enlarged prostate can cause urinary retention, which may lead to bladder damage and kidney problems. Treatment options include medication, surgery, and lifestyle changes.

What are the treatment options for an enlarged prostate?

There are a number of treatment options for an enlarged prostate, and the best option for you will depend on a number of factors, including the severity of your symptoms, your age, and your overall health.

Medical treatments for an enlarged prostate include:

-Alpha blockers: These medications relax the muscles around the prostate and make urination easier. They may be used to relieve moderate to severe symptoms.
-5-alpha reductase inhibitors: These medications shrink the prostate by blocking the production of a hormone that leads to enlargement. They may be used to treat mild to moderate symptoms or prevent progression of the condition.
-Procedures: If medication doesn’t relieve your symptoms or if you have complication such as urinary retention or kidney damage, you may need a procedure to remove part of the prostate or fix blockages in the urinary tract.

What are the treatment options for prostate cancer?

The decision about whether and how to treat prostate cancer often depends on the stage (extent) of the cancer, your overall health and your preferences. You and your doctor will work together to develop a treatment plan that meets your individual needs.

Prostate cancer treatment may involve active surveillance, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy or chemotherapy.

Active surveillance
Active surveillance is an option for some men with early-stage prostate cancer. With active surveillance, you and your doctor closely monitor your prostate cancer without immediate treatment. The goal of active surveillance is to prevent or delay the treatment of a slow-growing cancer that may never cause symptoms or problems. But it’s important to note that even with active surveillance, you’ll still need regular monitoring for any changes in your condition.

Surgery
Surgery is an option for many men with prostate cancer. The two main types of surgery used to treat prostate cancer are radical prostatectomy and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). In a radical prostatectomy, the surgeon removes the entire prostate gland along with nearby lymph nodes. During a TURP, a surgeon removes tissue from inside the tube that drains urine from your bladder (urethra). In some cases, surgery may be done using a robot-assisted approach. This type of surgery requires special training and experience on the part of the surgeon.

Radiation therapy
Radiation therapy uses high-energy beams to kill cells or shrink tumors. External beam radiation therapy directs radiation beams from a machine outside your body at the cancerous area inside your body. Internal beam radiation therapy (brachytherapy) places radioactive materials in direct contact withcancerous tissue inside your body. There are two types of brachytherapy — Low dose rate (LDR) and high dose rate (HDR). In LDR brachytherapy, tiny radioactive seeds are placed in or near your prostate gland for several days or weeks while you remain in the hospital. The seeds then remain in place permanently, giving off low doses of radiation over time and usually require no further treatment once they’re implanted. In HDR brachytherapy, thin tubes (catheters) are placed in or near your prostate gland for only a short time while you receive higher doses of radiation than with LDR brachytherapy during each treatment session. These treatments are done while you’re under anesthesia in a hospital setting and usually require several sessions over several weeks’ time to complete the course of treatment..

Hormone therapy
Hormone therapy is also called androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), because it works by lowering levels of male hormones called androgens that can fuel tumor growth.. Estrogen Therapy uses drugs — either alone or in combination with another hormone suppressor called Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone analogues (GnRH analogues) — to lower levels of male hormones.. Antiandrogens block testosterone receptors throughout the body so that testosterone can no longer bind to them.. Orchiectomy is surgical removal of one or both testicles.. In some cases, doctors may recommend adrenalectomy — surgical removal of one or both adrenal glands — if other hormone suppression treatments haven’t worked well enough.. GnRH analogues act on receptors located on cells in the pituitary gland . This class of drugs lowers testosterone production by “turned off” signals from GnRH receptors on cells in the pituitary gland.. When used alone, GnRH agonists act quickly to reduce testosterone levels within two weeks after starting treatment.. Side effects include hot flashes , fatigue , loss of sexual desire , erectile dysfunction , osteoporosis , anemia , difficulty concentrating , depression , cognitive impairment . These side effects often improve after 6 to 12 months as men become accustomed to living without testosterone.. Combined Androgen Blockade is when doctors prescribe both an antiandrogen medication plus either an LHRH agonist or estrogens . CAB has been found helpful as an initial strategy for treating symptomatic metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer . However this approach does not appear offer any significant advantage over using LHRH agonists alone after 3 years ..

Chemotherapy Chemotherapy uses cytotoxic drugs — drugs that kill cells —to kill rapidly reproducing cells such as cancer cells . Chemotherapy drugs can be given intravenously into a vein through a needle placed in an arm .. They also can be taken orally as pills .. Chemotherapy drugs circulate throughoutthe body through blood vessels killing rapidly dividing cells along their way .. Common side effects associated with chemotherapy include fatigue , nausea / vomiting , loss appetite , diarrhoea , mouth sores / mucositis ..